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Tech education program sparks surprise visit


When we last introduced you to the students learning the trade at Malloy, a lot of excitement followed.

 

Many shared the WIN story of how this company was partnering with state programs to build its future workforce.

 

It’s created opportunities for students like Eli Huber, whose Build Dakota scholarship is partially funded by Malloy, pays for his tuition at Lake Area Tech and commits him to staying in South Dakota at least three years.

 

Thousands of business leaders have now heard his story – including philanthropist Denny Sanford, who was so impressed by the students he decided to pay a visit to Malloy.

 

“It’s fun meeting these kids who are excited about their future,” said Sanford, whose $25 million donation helped match state funds to start the Build Dakota program in 2015.

 

“They are people who like to work with their hands, and they’re getting excited about their future job opportunities and making some really big money, and contributing to the state at the same time. It’s a wonderful program.”

 

The students were eager to talk to the man who helped back Build Dakota.

 

“I was actually really honored to meet him because I know a lot of kids that have benefited from his Build Dakota,” Huber said. “I thought it was pretty cool.”

 

So did Sanford’s longtime friend and Malloy owner Garry Jacobson.

 

“I’m extremely impressed by these young people,” he said. “We’re truly thankful to Denny for all he’s done to fund the beginning of the program, get the state to fund it and get industry to get in to fund it. He done a fabulous legacy job.”

 

After seeing the students at work, Sanford said the program “is better than what I expected.”

 

“Because I see the enthusiasm with these kids going through a different type of college,” he continued. “It’s a dream come true.”

Workforce Training: The Sioux Falls Advantage

There is better training for our workforce in Sioux Falls. A multitude of options are available to meet businesses' needs at the postsecondary level including city programs, state grants, technical training, and a new $50 million scholarship program for technical school students.

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